Learning through singing

Have you ever been to a restaurant and all of a sudden you hear a song that transports you back to a place, a gathering or a memorable experience? Songs are a powerful tool that can be felt emotionally, physically and cognitively. Pause for a moment and ponder. You can recall songs that you have not heard in years. Songs can make you cry or be extremely happy. Songs can be used as a memory device so that you can recall any information at will. Songs are used to comfort, inspire and enjoy. The question everyone should ask is: Why aren’t songs being used more effectively by educators and parents to help nurture children?

Learning through Singing began as a concept when I became the learning center teacher at Child’s Voice School in Wood Dale, Illinois. The children at Child’s Voice have a moderate to profound hearing loss and many have cochlear implants. It’s an oral school so the children are taught to listen and speak. My position was designed to increase language while maintaining a regular education atmosphere. I sat at my desk wondering how I

The children had a blast and I had them singing or reciting non-stop for 10 minutes first thing in the morning. It’s important to note that the children sang with gusto.  All that mattered was that they were singing all the words. My work became more fine-tuned. I wrote two articles that were published in Volta Voice, a magazine published by A.G. Bell.

 

The first, Learning through Singing (July/August 2010) was a how-to piece for teachers and parents. The second, My Story, My Song (July/August 2014) was inspired by a student who used her oral skills as naturally as any child would. It cited research about the value of song. I presented at the Moog Consortium on 2015. My workshop How to Incorporate

Songs in Your Classroom was well received. Everyone was singing and learning. Educators found my articles and wrote to me.

The concept of using songs worked for all children. It could be universally applied.

 

So now I would like more people to use songs as a tool. It combines music and words so that both brain hemispheres are active and their synergy affects a person’s emotional and cognitive wellbeing.

 

So now get ready and sing.

 

Mrs. Jeanette

could make all the children talk as much as possible while making sure that the slower ones were not feeling badly about their speed of talking or their linguistic accuracy. Since I had a regular education background as well as my oral deaf education I thought about how children learn naturally.

 

The idea struck me viscerally.

 

Children enjoy doing choral activities-reciting silly nursery rhymes, saying goofy idioms and singing songs.  By doing choral activities the children could practice fluency, learn language, acquire world knowledge and practice auditory skills. They could do this while having fun. Try singing ABC song in your regular voice, as a cat and then as an old man.

My philosophy

background & education

Jeanette C Hachmeister has been teaching her entire life.

  • At sixteen she created a tutoring club at her high school. The club helped underprivileged students.
  • After she received her BA with an elementary education endorsement, she decided to go to a premier graduate school: Smith College/Clarke School for the Deaf. There she learned how thrilling it was to hear children with profound hearing loss talk.
  • After various jobs, she found her dream job at Child’s Voice School, a listening and spoken language school.  She became the learning center teacher, a position that fused regular education norms with specialized language instruction. She and her students literally burst into songs effortlessly throughout the day.
  • At this time, she won the prestigious Golden Apple Award in 2009. Out of 1000 candidates, Jeanette was one of ten winners. Later one of Jeanette’s judges stated that she thought all the students were just regular education students because they talked, sang and interacted just like their hearing peers.
  • The award helped Jeanette realize that others might benefit from her insights. She wrote two articles for Volta Voices: Learning Through Singing (2010) and My Story, My Song (2014). These articles lead to a few workshops including How to Incorporate Songs in Your Classroom at the Moog Consortium in 2015.
  • Presently, Jeanette is a learning specialist in Colorado. She intends to bring her message to a new population and hopes to have new children and their parents learn through singing.

what my students & parents say

From the entire Child’s Voice Family given May 2016

You have served Child’s Voice so well for so many years. You have influenced the lives of countless children. You have left an indelible mark on so many people. Because of you, children can listen and speak. They can think critically. They are prepared for mainstream school, school that at one time may have been considered out of their reach. You set a high bar for the students and you helped them meet it. You are truly a phenomenal teacher.

From a mom

Four summers ago when my son started the EI Toddler Group at Child’s Voice I heard children singing down the hall. I had to find out where this singing was coming from. It was coming from your classroom. The children followed you out a single file line and sang behind you as you lead them out to recess. It made me so happy to hear children singing because it gave me a glimpse of what my son’s future would be like as Child’s Voice. I looked forward to seeing those “big kids” walk down the hall and follow your creative directions that you would give as you walked out to recess, like acting out different animals, for example. I could tell that those children loved and respected you.  As I sat there I wished that you would one day be Jacob’s teacher.  Fast forward four year. I’m so glad my son had the opportunity to have you. He loves you Mrs. Jeanette and so do we!  You are an excellent teacher and he loves coming to your room. You made learning fun and exciting for your students. We saved all of the copies of the songs and poems you did in class and we love going back and singing them again…We can’t thank you enough for all of your hard work and dedication.

 

Carolyn

 

From her five-year old son

I love you Mrs. Jeanette.  I will miss you. J

From a mom
named Colleen

We will forever be grateful for you for how well you have prepared our son for the mainstream. Honestly he has soared under your directions. We appreciate the high standards you have for the kids. You expect more from them and they meet your expectations. I will never forget the letter you sent home with words describing each student. I marveled at how wonderful a gift that was-affirming words for each student. Not only did you prepare and teach our kids’ minds you are good for their hearts and souls. Thank you for being a life changer.

 

From her son

Mrs. Jeanette.  I love you.  L

From Tim and Matt

It is hard to say whether we are more grateful for how you have helped shape our son into the beautiful boy he is today or for how much you have taught us as parents. Your guidance, your patience and your beautiful voice have forever changed this family.

 

From their son

I love you Mrs. Jeanette    Z

I am writing this letter in support of Ms. Jeanette Hachmeister.

 

We have had the pleasure of working with Ms. Hachmeister (Ms. Jeanette to us!) since August 2014 when she became our son, Aryan’s, Learning Center teacher. Ary was born with bilateral profound congenital hearing loss and was implanted at 10 months of age. He has been attending his school, Child’s Voice, since 2.5 years of age and is currently 6.5 years old. Unfortunately, Aryan has had significant difficulty hearing and speaking even after implantation due in part to a small nerve and, possibly, a non-functioning implant on the right. At Child’s Voice, he began to make significant improvements in his listening and spoken language.

 

When Ary entered Ms. Jeanette’s class for his kindergarten year, he was still about 1.5 years behind in his speech and language. His speech was still very difficult to understand particularly to those who did not know him.  His vocabulary was still limited and, socially, he was still shy around his hearing peers.

 

Ms. Jeanette’s expertise shone through via our son in the first few weeks of the year. She takes a confidence building approach for her students while utilizing her formal training to make every encounter with her students educational. Ary ‘s self-esteem under Ms. Jeanette’s encouragement has improved in leaps and bounds. He is now very social with his peers on his soccer team and his hearing brother’s friends. Jeanette’s individual approach to his speech and listening has helped him improve, not only in achieving his age appropriate speech goals but, also, in improving his social skills which are essential to his success in the mainstream.

 

Under her tutelage, he has also developed his love of learning. Ms. Jeanette’s approach to kindergarten and first grade group education is designed to give him the tools to succeed as he progresses into his mainstream education.  Her use, in particular, of music in the classroom has helped him develop self- confidence in his speech and fostered his love of music. The music she develops for the classroom teaches students about a variety of topics including holidays, educational concepts, and everyday activities. I often hear Aryan singing his favorite songs in the shower including “The Scientific Method,” “The Vowel Song,” and “The Paul Bunyan Song.” His love of music shines through every year in the school holiday program where he routinely tries to out-sing his classmates. He also brings this love home where he nightly has singing and dance parties with his hearing brothers and attends music classes with his hearing peers. Before his experiences in Ms. Jeanette’s class, I never dreamed, as a child with hearing loss, that Aryan would grow to love music and use it as a social outlet.

 

Aryan is now in the 1st grade. He has been interviewing for a position in the top Chicago private schools for 2nd grade. As we move through these interviews, the teachers and principals at these schools are uniformly impressed by his self-confidence, social interactions and his obvious love of education. We credit Child’s Voice, and in particular, Ms. Jeanette’s teaching with these traits.

 

We give our highest recommendation to Ms. Jeanette. As parents, we appreciate her devotion to her students and their education.  As physicians, we are impressed by Jeanette’s expertise and her ability to treat each student individually to their own strengths. She is an advocate for her students and an educator for us as parents.

 

Please feel free to contact us with any questions.

 

 

    Sincerely,

Angela Chaudhari, MD

    Assistant Professor

    Division of Minimally Invasive Gynecologic Surgery

    Northwestern University FSM

 

Alpesh A. Patel, MD

    Professor and Chief of Spine Surgery

    Dept of Orthopedic Surgery

    Northwestern University FSM

Click on the link below for songs to share. Please check back as this link will be updated monthly with new songs.

Learning Through singing: songs to share

Contact me to schedule a session

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Learning
through singing

Have you ever been to a restaurant and all of a sudden you hear a song that transports you back to a place, a gathering or a memorable experience? Songs are a powerful tool that can be felt emotionally, physically and cognitively. Pause for a moment and ponder. You can recall songs that you have not heard in years. Songs can make you cry or be extremely happy Songs can be used as a memory device so that you can recall any information at will. Songs are used to comfort, inspire and enjoy. The question everyone should ask is: Why aren’t songs being used more effectively by educators and parents to help nurture children?

Learning through Singing began as a concept when I became the learning center teacher at Child’s Voice School in Wood Dale, Illinois. The children at Child’s Voice have a moderate to profound hearing loss and many have cochlear implants. It’s an oral school so the children are taught to listen and speak. My position was designed to increase language while maintaining a regular education atmosphere. I sat at my desk wondering how I could make all the children talk as much as possible while making sure that the slower ones were not feeling badly about their speed of talking or their linguistic accuracy. Since I had a regular education background as well as my oral deaf education I thought about how children learn naturally.

The idea struck me viscerally.

 

Children enjoy doing choral activities-reciting silly nursery rhymes, saying goofy idioms and singing songs.  By doing choral activities the children could practice fluency, learn language, acquire world knowledge and practice auditory skills.  They could do this while having fun. Try singing ABC song in your regular voice, as a cat and then as an old man.

 

The children had a blast and I had them singing or reciting non-stop for 10 minutes first thing in the morning. It’s important to note that the children sang with gusto.  All that mattered was that they were singing all the words. My work became more fine-tuned. I wrote two articles that were published in Volta Voice, a magazine published by A.G. Bell.

 

The first, Learning through Singing (July/August 2010) was a how-to piece for teachers and parents. The second, My Story, My Song (July/August 2014) was inspired by a student who used

her oral skills as naturally as any child would. It cited research about the value of song. I presented at the Moog Consortium on 2015. My workshop How to Incorporate Songs in Your Classroom was well received.

 

Everyone was singing and learning. Educators found my articles and wrote to me. The concept of using songs worked for all children. It could be universally applied.

 

So now I would like more people to use songs as a tool. It combines music and words so that both brain hemispheres are active and their synergy affects a person’s emotional and cognitive wellbeing.

 

So now get ready and sing.

 

Mrs. Jeanette

  • At sixteen she created a tutoring club at her high school. The club helped underprivileged students.
  • After she received her BA with an elementary education endorsement, she decided to go to a premier graduate school: Smith College/Clarke School for the Deaf. There she learned how thrilling it was to hear children with profound hearing loss talk.
  • After various jobs, she found her dream job at Child’s Voice School, a listening and spoken language school.  She became the learning center teacher, a position that fused regular education norms with specialized language instruction. She and her students literally burst into songs effortlessly throughout the day.
  • At this time, she won the prestigious Golden Apple Award in 2009. Out of 1000 candidates, Jeanette was one of ten winners. Later one of Jeanette’s judges stated that she thought all the students were just regular education students because they talked, sang and interacted just like their hearing peers.
  • The award helped Jeanette realize that others might benefit from her insights. She wrote two articles for Volta Voices: Learning Through Singing (2010) and My Story, My Song (2014). These articles lead to a few workshops including How to Incorporate Songs in Your Classroom at the Moog Consortium in 2015.
  • Presently, Jeanette is a learning specialist in Colorado. She intends to bring her message to a new population and hopes to have new children and their parents learn through singing.

I am writing this letter in support of Ms. Jeanette Hachmeister.

 

We have had the pleasure of working with Ms. Hachmeister (Ms. Jeanette to us!) since August 2014 when she became our son, Aryan’s, Learning Center teacher. Ary was born with bilateral profound congenital hearing loss and was implanted at 10 months of age. He has been attending his school, Child’s Voice, since 2.5 years of age and is currently 6.5 years old. Unfortunately, Aryan has had significant difficulty hearing and speaking even after implantation due in part to a small nerve and, possibly, a non-functioning implant on the right. At Child’s Voice, he began to make significant improvements in his listening and spoken language.

 

When Ary entered Ms. Jeanette’s class for his kindergarten year, he was still about 1.5 years behind in his speech and language. His speech was still very difficult to understand particularly to those who did not know him.  His vocabulary was still limited and, socially, he was still shy around his hearing peers.

 

Ms. Jeanette’s expertise shone through via our son in the first few weeks of the year. She takes a confidence building approach for her students while utilizing her formal training to make every encounter with her students educational. Ary ‘s self-esteem under Ms. Jeanette’s encouragement has improved in leaps and bounds. He is now very social with his peers on his soccer team and his hearing brother’s friends. Jeanette’s individual approach to his speech and listening has helped him improve, not only in achieving his age appropriate speech goals but, also, in improving his social skills which are essential to his success in the mainstream.

 

Under her tutelage, he has also developed his love of learning. Ms. Jeanette’s approach to kindergarten and first grade group education is designed to give him the tools to succeed as he progresses into his mainstream education.  Her use, in particular, of music in the

classroom has helped him develop self- confidence in his speech and fostered his love of music. The music she develops for the classroom teaches students about a variety of topics including holidays, educational concepts, and everyday activities. I often hear Aryan singing his favorite songs in the shower including “The Scientific Method,” “The Vowel Song,” and “The Paul Bunyan Song.” His love of music shines through every year in the school holiday program where he routinely tries to out-sing his classmates. He also brings this love home where he nightly has singing and dance parties with his hearing brothers and attends music classes with his hearing peers. Before his experiences in Ms. Jeanette’s class, I never dreamed, as a child with hearing loss, that Aryan would grow to love music and use it as a social outlet.

 

Aryan is now in the 1st grade. He has been interviewing for a position in the top Chicago private schools for 2nd grade. As we move through these interviews, the teachers and principals at these schools are uniformly impressed by his self-confidence, social interactions and his obvious love of education. We credit Child’s Voice, and in particular, Ms. Jeanette’s teaching with these traits.

 

We give our highest recommendation to Ms. Jeanette. As parents, we appreciate her devotion to her students and their education. As physicians, we are impressed by Jeanette’s expertise and her ability to treat each student individually to their own strengths. She is an advocate for her students and an educator for us as parents.

 

Please feel free to contact us with any questions.

 

 

    Sincerely,

Angela Chaudhari, MD

    Assistant Professor

    Division of Minimally Invasive Gynecologic Surgery

    Northwestern University FSM

 

    Alpesh A. Patel, MD

    Professor and Chief of Spine Surgery

    Dept of Orthopedic Surgery

    Northwestern University FSM

Learning through Singing began as a concept when I became the learning center teacher at Child’s Voice School in Wood Dale, Illinois. The children at Child’s Voice have a moderate to profound hearing loss and many have cochlear implants. It’s an oral school so the children are taught to listen and speak. My position was designed to increase language while maintaining a regular education atmosphere. I sat at my desk wondering how I could make all the children talk as much as possible while making sure that the slower ones were not feeling badly about their speed of talking or their linguistic accuracy. Since I had a regular education background as well as my oral deaf education I thought about how children learn naturally.

 

The idea struck me viscerally.

Children enjoy doing choral activities-reciting silly nursery rhymes, saying goofy idioms and singing songs.  By doing choral activities the children could practice fluency, learn language, acquire world knowledge and practice auditory skills.  They could do this while having fun. Try singing ABC song in your regular voice, as a cat and then as an old man.

 

The children had a blast and I had them singing or reciting non-stop for 10 minutes first thing in the morning. It’s important to note that the children sang with gusto.  All that mattered was that they were singing all the words. My work became more fine-tuned. I wrote two articles that were published in Volta Voice, a magazine published by A.G. Bell.

 

The first, Learning through Singing (July/August 2010) was a how-to piece for teachers and parents. The second, My Story, My Song (July/August 2014) was inspired by a

student who used her oral skills as naturally as any child would. It cited research about the value of song. I presented at the Moog Consortium on 2015. My workshop How to Incorporate Songs in Your Classroom was well received.

 

Everyone was singing and learning. Educators found my articles and wrote to me. The concept of using songs worked for all children. It could be universally applied.

 

So now I would like more people to use songs as a tool. It combines music and words so that both brain hemispheres are active and their synergy affects a person’s emotional and cognitive wellbeing.

 

So now get ready and sing.

 

Mrs. Jeanette

  • At sixteen she created a tutoring club at her high school. The club helped underprivileged students.
  • After she received her BA with an elementary education endorsement, she decided to go to a premier graduate school: Smith College/Clarke School for the Deaf. There she learned how thrilling it was to hear children with profound hearing loss talk.
  • After various jobs, she found her dream job at Child’s Voice School, a listening and spoken language school.  She became the learning center teacher, a position that fused regular education norms with specialized language instruction. She and her students literally burst into songs effortlessly throughout the day.
  • At this time, she won the prestigious Golden Apple Award in 2009. Out of 1000 candidates, Jeanette was one of ten winners. Later one of Jeanette’s judges stated that she thought all the

students were just regular education students because they talked, sang and interacted just like their hearing peers.

  • The award helped Jeanette realize that others might benefit from her insights. She wrote two articles for Volta Voices: Learning Through Singing (2010) and My Story, My Song (2014). These articles lead to a few workshops including How to Incorporate Songs in Your Classroom at the Moog Consortium in 2015.
  • Presently, Jeanette is a learning specialist in Colorado. She intends to bring her message to a new population and hopes to have new children and their parents learn through singing.

Learning through Singing began as a concept when I became the learning center teacher at Child’s Voice School in Wood Dale, Illinois. The children at Child’s Voice have a moderate to profound hearing loss and many have cochlear implants. It’s an oral school so the children are taught to listen and speak. My position was designed to increase language while maintaining a regular education atmosphere.

 

I sat at my desk wondering how I could make all the children talk as much as possible while making sure that the slower ones were not feeling badly about their speed of talking or their linguistic accuracy. Since I had a regular education background as well as my oral deaf education I thought about how children learn naturally.

 

The idea struck me viscerally.

 

Children enjoy doing choral activities-reciting silly nursery rhymes, saying goofy idioms and singing songs.  By doing choral activities the children could practice fluency, learn language, acquire world knowledge and practice auditory skills. They could do this while having fun. Try singing ABC song in your regular voice, as a cat and then as an old man.

 

The children had a blast and I had them singing or reciting non-stop for 10 minutes first thing in the morning. It’s important to note that the children sang with gusto.  All that mattered was that they were singing all the words. My work became more fine-tuned. I wrote two articles that were published in Volta Voice, a magazine published by A.G. Bell.

 

The first, Learning through Singing (July/August 2010) was a how-to piece for teachers and parents. The second, My Story, My Song (July/August 2014) was inspired by a student who used her oral skills as naturally as any child would. It cited research about the value of song. I presented at the Moog Consortium on 2015. My workshop How to Incorporate Songs in Your Classroom was well received.

Everyone was singing and learning.

Educators found my articles and wrote to me. The concept of using songs worked for all children. It could be universally applied.

 

So now I would like more people to use songs as a tool. It combines music and words so that both brain hemispheres are active and their synergy affects a person’s emotional and cognitive wellbeing.

 

So now get ready and sing.

 

Mrs. Jeanette

Learning through singing

Have you ever been to a restaurant and all of a sudden you hear a song that transports you back to a place, a gathering or a memorable experience? Songs are a powerful tool that can be felt emotionally, physically and cognitively. Pause for a moment and ponder. You can recall songs that you have not heard in years. Songs can make you cry or be extremely happy Songs can be used as a memory device so that you can recall any information at will. Songs are used to comfort, inspire and enjoy. The question everyone should ask is: Why aren’t songs being used more effectively by educators and parents to help nurture children?

Angela Chaudhari, MD

    Assistant Professor

    Division of Minimally Invasive
    Gynecologic Surgery

    Northwestern University FSM

 

Alpesh A. Patel, MD

    Professor and Chief of Spine Surgery

    Dept of Orthopedic Surgery

    Northwestern University FSM

Learning through singing

Have you ever been to a restaurant and all of a sudden you hear a song that transports you back to a place, a gathering or a memorable experience? Songs are a powerful tool that can be felt emotionally, physically and cognitively. Pause for a moment and ponder. You can recall songs that you have not heard in years. Songs can make you cry or be extremely happy Songs can be used as a memory device so that you can recall any information at will. Songs are used to comfort, inspire and enjoy. The question everyone should ask is: Why aren’t songs being used more effectively by educators and parents to help nurture children?

background & education

what my students & parents say

Angela Chaudhari, MD

   Assistant Professor

    Division of Minimally Invasive
    Gynecologic Surgery

    Northwestern University FSM

 

Alpesh A. Patel, MD

   Professor and Chief of
    Spine Surgery

    Dept of Orthopedic Surgery

    Northwestern University FSM

Learning Through singing: songs to share

Contact me to schedule a session

Learning through Singing began as a concept when I became the learning center teacher at Child’s Voice School in Wood Dale, Illinois. The children at Child’s Voice have a moderate to profound hearing loss and many have cochlear implants. It’s an oral school so the children are taught to listen and speak. My position was designed to increase language while maintaining a regular education atmosphere. I sat at my desk wondering how I could make all the children talk as much as possible while making sure that the slower ones were not feeling badly about their speed of talking or their linguistic accuracy. Since I had a regular education background as well as my oral deaf education I thought about how children learn naturally.

 

The idea struck me viscerally.

 

Children enjoy doing choral activities-reciting silly nursery rhymes, saying goofy idioms and singing songs. By doing choral activities the children could practice fluency, learn language, acquire world knowledge and practice auditory skills. They could do this while having fun. Try singing ABC song in your regular voice, as a cat and then as an old man. The children had a blast and I had them singing or reciting non-stop for 10 minutes first thing in the morning. It’s important to note that the children sang with gusto.  All that mattered was that they were singing all the words. My work became more fine-tuned. I wrote two articles that were published in Volta Voice, a magazine published by A.G. Bell.

 

The first, Learning through Singing (July/August 2010) was a how-to piece for teachers and parents. The second, My Story, My Song (July/August 2014) was inspired by a student who used her oral skills as naturally as any child would. It cited research about the value of song. I presented at the Moog Consortium on 2015. My workshop How to Incorporate Songs in Your Classroom was well received. Everyone was singing and learning.

 

Educators found my articles and wrote to me. The concept of using songs worked for all children. It could be universally applied.

 

So now I would like more people to use songs as a tool. It combines music and words so that both brain hemispheres are active and their synergy affects a person’s emotional and cognitive wellbeing.

 

So now get ready and sing.

 

Mrs. Jeanette

My philosophy

Mrs. jeanette's Tutoring logo